What are discount Dental Plans?

In general Dental plans are a low cost alternative to dental insurance. Dental care services become more affordable with discount dental plans for families in the lower income bracket. A dental plan is a kind of a club you join where we have a section of providers and consumers. In a discounted dental plan, the providers have agreed to provide the services at a discounted rate.

As a consumer, one just has to display his or her membership card while visiting the provider. These discounted dental plans do not purport to insurance in any way, they are just discount programs. For more information about discount dental plans simply visit True Dental Discounts today!

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Dry Mouth: Symptoms and Treatment

Reduced saliva flow that results in a dry mouth is a common problem among older adults. It is caused by certain medical disorders and is often a side effect of medications such as antihistamines, decongestants, pain killers and diuretics.

Some symptoms you may experience if you have dry mouth are:

  • A constant sore throat
  • Burning sensation
  • Problems speaking
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Hoarseness
  • Dry nasal passages

Left untreated, dry mouth can damage your teeth. Without adequate saliva to lubricate your mouth, wash away food, and neutralize the acids produced by plaque, extensive decay can occur. Your dentist can recommend various methods to restore moisture. Sugar-free candy or gum stimulates saliva flow, and moisture can be replaced by using artificial saliva and oral rinses. Semiannual dental visits are essential in order to ensure the health of your mouth. Schedule your semiannual dentist appointment today using your True Dental Discount plan and save big while sustaining your oral health.

Bad Breath or Something More?

At one time or another, we have all been guilty of it. Instead of choosing your usual plain bagel, you opt for the onion and accept the bad breath that is sure to follow. You pop a couple of mints or brush your teeth an extra time, and the odor subsides. But when bad breath will not cease, a more serious problem may be to blame.

Gum Disease, also known as Periodontal disease, is a growing problem in modern America. Periodontal disease is an infection of the tissues that support your teeth. The space between the tooth and the gum line begins to widen due to the infection, allowing pockets to form and collect debris. As the pockets continue to fill with debris, the infection grows worse and the gap continues to widen, oftentimes leading to tooth loss.

Some symptoms of Periodontal disease can include:

  • Gums that bleed easily
  • Red, swollen, tender gums
  • Gums that have pulled away from the teeth
  • Persistent bad breath or bad taste
  • Permanent teeth that are loose or separating
  • Any change in the way your teeth fit together when you bite
  • Any change in the fit of partial dentures

It is possible, however, to have periodontal disease and have no warning signs or symptoms. Therefore, it is vital to visit the Dentist for regular check-ups and cleanings to ensure your dental health is not in jeopardy. Schedule an appointment with your local Dentist in the True Care Discount, Dental Network today to ensure your oral health.

Q: What is sialadenitis?

A: In short, sialadenitis is a disorder of the salivary gland. One of several related disorders, this condition is caused by a painful bacterial infection in a person’s salivary gland. Many times, this infection is caused by staphylococcus or anaerobic bacteria. According to researchers at Harvard Medical School, sialadenitis is most common in elderly adults and very young infants. Symptoms include a painful lump in the cheek or under the chin, or foul-tasting pus released into the mouth from the salivary duct. In severe cases, the person may experience flu-like symptoms, including a fever and chills. The most severe cases usually occur in elderly people who do not receive treatment for their symptoms.

Researchers suggest that several factors may increase a person’s risk of developing sialadenitis, including dehydration, malnutrition, chronic illness, and certain medications like antihistamines and diuretics. Infants who are born prematurely and people in professions like trumpet-playing and glassblowing may also be at increased risk. If you or someone in your family is faced with sialadenitis, it is important to seek the help of a health care professional. A doctor or dentist can gently examine your head and neck to check for any potential gland issues. Fortunately, sialadenitis can typically be cured with an antibiotic that causes symptoms to subside within a couple days. In more severe cases, surgery can be performed to drain the gland.

So remember: If you ever notice a lump or swelling in your neck, jaw, or mouth, contact a dentist on your True Dental Discounts, dental plan immediately – particularly if the lump is painful or makes it difficult to chew or swallow. Awareness of your body is the first step toward remaining healthy, so stay alert and seek help when needed.

Can Oral Care for Babies Prevent Future Cavities?

Cavities are the most prevalent infectious disease in U.S. children, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Statistics show that the most prevalent disease in U.S. children is tooth decay.  The reality is that before the child reaches kindergarten nearly 40% will have at least 1cavitiy.  The problem is even more predominant in areas of low socioeconomic demographics.

Research is being done that is changing the preconceived belief that the children ages 19 and 33 months are most susceptible to tooth decay; now more and more researchers believe that this window occurs at a much younger age.

The bacteria in infant’s mouths have been shown to be much more diverse and the soft tissue of the mouth works as a reservoir of pathogens prior to the teeth erupting.  It is important to refrain your infants from formula containing sugar and you should wipe off the infants gums with a wet cloth to remove harmful bacteria formation that occurs on the gum line.

The connection between periodontal disease and menopause

Menopause is a time of great change for women’s health and bodies. One area that is often overlooked, though, is the change women go through regarding their oral health at this time. According to the American Academy of Periodontology, women who are menopausal or post-menopausal may discover that their mouths have become uncomfortable. Many experience dry mouth, gum tissue pain, and a changed sense of taste, particularly in salty, peppery or sour flavors.

A small number of women also experience menopausal gingivostomatitis, which involves gums that look dry/shiny, bleed easily and are abnormally colored (very pale to very dark). The academy notes that estrogen supplements and Hormone Replacement Therapy may help protect women’s teeth and get rid of these symptoms. It’s important to talk to your doctor and dentist about the changes you notice in your mouth during menopause so you can start returning to normal as quickly as possible.

Is there too much sugar in your diet?

We all know that eating a lot of sugar can have negative effects on our physical health. It can cause weight gain, energy swings and a weakened immune system. But what effects does sugar have on your oral health? According to the American Dental Association, when bacteria/plaque comes into contact with sugar in a person’s mouth, the acid that gets produced can damage teeth for 20 minutes or longer. Over time, this damage results in tooth decay. In addition, foods that are high in sugar are often filled with empty calories and lack other nutrients that are good for your health. These sugary foods can lead to poor nutrition, which the ADA suggests can lead to faster progression of gum disease.

Dietary habits are often developed in childhood, so it’s especially important for adults to teach their kids to eat healthily and get plenty of fruits, vegetables and calcium from a young age. Other precautionary steps include drinking a lot of water, limiting snacks in between meals, brushing twice a day, flossing, and visiting the dentist regularly. It may also help to keep track of all the food you eat so you can chart your progress and notice patterns of sugary food consumption. Talk to your dentist about your eating habits and develop a plan to cut back on sugar-filled foods. It’s a commitment that will benefit your body and your teeth!

Causes of a painful tongue

People often think about the dentist as a professional that deals with teeth. In reality, however, dentists are concerned with the entire mouth – including your tongue. For this reason, he or she may talk to you about the appearance of your tongue and why your tongue affects your overall health. One of the biggest problems people experience with their tongue is having it be sore and bumpy. According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, there are several causes of a sore tongue, including trauma, canker sores, smoking, and oral cancer. The most obvious cause, trauma, can be a result of biting your tongue or burning it on something that’s too hot.

When this happens, the tongue may continue to be sore until the injury heals. Smoking, however, is a more permanent habit that causes damage through irritation; people who smoke frequently may find that their tongue feels unpleasant. Canker sores – or mouth ulcers – can also cause temporary pain and bumps on your tongue. No one knows what causes these sores, but stress is thought to be a trigger. Finally, although not common, sores/bumps that do not go away after a couple weeks could be a sign of oral cancer. Talk to your dentist about any tongue abnormalities you notice so you can get started on a treatment plan if necessary. By taking care of your tongue, you can improve your overall health.

Protecting your teeth from sports injuries

Sports are a great way to stay active, but they can wreak havoc on a person’s teeth in case of an injury. This is especially true for contact sports such as football, hockey and basketball. One of the best ways to protect your teeth is by using a mouth guard. These plastic protectors can prevent broken teeth or tissue damage in the case of a stray ball, tough tackle, or other impact to the face. The three main types of mouth guards are stock, “boil and bite,” and custom – each offering differing levels of protection for a range of prices. Stock mouth guards can be found in any sporting goods store and are already pre-formed.

Depending on the size of the athlete’s mouth, these may not fit well and can be uncomfortable. They do, however, still provide a minimal amount of protection. “Boil and bite” guards can also be purchased at sporting good stores, but these are able to be fitted to a person’s mouth by allowing the plastic to become flexible in hot water and then molding them around the teeth. This is usually a better option than stock mouth guards, but they can be a bit pricier, running up to $40 or so. The final option of custom mouth guards are the most expensive, but they also provide the highest level of protection. These guards are typically made by a dentist and are designed to custom-fit an athlete’s mouth. A dentist takes an impression of the person’s mouth and then fills it with plaster to create a model of that individual’s teeth and gums. Custom mouth guards are generally the most comfortable and are priced anywhere from $100 to a few hundred dollars.

The American Dental Association highly recommends wearing a mouth guard during all sporting activities, particularly for people who have braces. Braces can easily cut into gums and other soft tissue, creating an extra hazard for their wearers. It’s important to make an appointment with your dentist or orthodontist to discuss your options for wearing a mouth guard. With the addition of this small safety precaution, you can help ensure that you have a beautiful smile all year round.

Pediatric dentistry isn’t just for kids

When your children are small, going to a pediatric dentist can be a great way to relieve their anxiety about the dentist. Pediatric dentists are trained to meet the specific needs of children, which means they often have more success relating to their patients and making the process as smooth as possible. But what happens when your children turn into teenagers? According to the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, teenagers should continue to see their pediatric dentist through adolescence.

Pediatric dentists also specialize in teen dental issues, and it is important for your teenager to continue seeing a dentist who knows his or her history. Teenagers’ mouths are still rapidly changing, which makes it even more critical that they continue regular appointments at the dentist. In addition, adult teeth emerging from the surface are susceptible to decay, and a pediatric dentist can monitor the growing process to ensure your teen’s mouth stays healthy as she transitions into adulthood. The Academy also emphasizes the importance of instilling good oral hygiene habits in teens, who by now are making their own dietary and hygiene choices.

A pediatric dentist can help guide them in these choices and will press upon them the importance of maintaining healthy teeth. Talk to a pediatric dentist in your True Dental Discounts, dental plan and ask about promoting the oral health of your teenager. He or she will become a great resource and can help ensure your teen enters adulthood with beautiful teeth.