Choosing a Dental Plan

While taking a decision on a discounted dental plan, it is important to be fully informed so that one can make a confident decision. The internet would be great tool to search for various plans in your area and compare them. Keeping the cost and benefits offered in mind, an informed decision can be made against the backdrop of your needs. Joining or enrolling in any of these plans is easy and quick; you just have to pay the fee using your credit card or electronic check and get the package online, in a matter of minutes. Many of these packages come with a 30 day money back guarantee, which means if you are not satisfied with the package or services, you can get your money back within 30 days without any questions being asked.

Many discounted dental plans offer ways to save on more than dental care, offering discounts on pharmacy prescriptions, vision etc. Keep these in mind while comparing the plans over on True Dental Discounts.

What are discount Dental Plans?

In general Dental plans are a low cost alternative to dental insurance. Dental care services become more affordable with discount dental plans for families in the lower income bracket. A dental plan is a kind of a club you join where we have a section of providers and consumers. In a discounted dental plan, the providers have agreed to provide the services at a discounted rate.

As a consumer, one just has to display his or her membership card while visiting the provider. These discounted dental plans do not purport to insurance in any way, they are just discount programs. For more information about discount dental plans simply visit True Dental Discounts today!

Dry Mouth: Symptoms and Treatment

Reduced saliva flow that results in a dry mouth is a common problem among older adults. It is caused by certain medical disorders and is often a side effect of medications such as antihistamines, decongestants, pain killers and diuretics.

Some symptoms you may experience if you have dry mouth are:

  • A constant sore throat
  • Burning sensation
  • Problems speaking
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Hoarseness
  • Dry nasal passages

Left untreated, dry mouth can damage your teeth. Without adequate saliva to lubricate your mouth, wash away food, and neutralize the acids produced by plaque, extensive decay can occur. Your dentist can recommend various methods to restore moisture. Sugar-free candy or gum stimulates saliva flow, and moisture can be replaced by using artificial saliva and oral rinses. Semiannual dental visits are essential in order to ensure the health of your mouth. Schedule your semiannual dentist appointment today using your True Dental Discount plan and save big while sustaining your oral health.

Bad Breath or Something More?

At one time or another, we have all been guilty of it. Instead of choosing your usual plain bagel, you opt for the onion and accept the bad breath that is sure to follow. You pop a couple of mints or brush your teeth an extra time, and the odor subsides. But when bad breath will not cease, a more serious problem may be to blame.

Gum Disease, also known as Periodontal disease, is a growing problem in modern America. Periodontal disease is an infection of the tissues that support your teeth. The space between the tooth and the gum line begins to widen due to the infection, allowing pockets to form and collect debris. As the pockets continue to fill with debris, the infection grows worse and the gap continues to widen, oftentimes leading to tooth loss.

Some symptoms of Periodontal disease can include:

  • Gums that bleed easily
  • Red, swollen, tender gums
  • Gums that have pulled away from the teeth
  • Persistent bad breath or bad taste
  • Permanent teeth that are loose or separating
  • Any change in the way your teeth fit together when you bite
  • Any change in the fit of partial dentures

It is possible, however, to have periodontal disease and have no warning signs or symptoms. Therefore, it is vital to visit the Dentist for regular check-ups and cleanings to ensure your dental health is not in jeopardy. Schedule an appointment with your local Dentist in the True Care Discount, Dental Network today to ensure your oral health.

Q: What is sialadenitis?

A: In short, sialadenitis is a disorder of the salivary gland. One of several related disorders, this condition is caused by a painful bacterial infection in a person’s salivary gland. Many times, this infection is caused by staphylococcus or anaerobic bacteria. According to researchers at Harvard Medical School, sialadenitis is most common in elderly adults and very young infants. Symptoms include a painful lump in the cheek or under the chin, or foul-tasting pus released into the mouth from the salivary duct. In severe cases, the person may experience flu-like symptoms, including a fever and chills. The most severe cases usually occur in elderly people who do not receive treatment for their symptoms.

Researchers suggest that several factors may increase a person’s risk of developing sialadenitis, including dehydration, malnutrition, chronic illness, and certain medications like antihistamines and diuretics. Infants who are born prematurely and people in professions like trumpet-playing and glassblowing may also be at increased risk. If you or someone in your family is faced with sialadenitis, it is important to seek the help of a health care professional. A doctor or dentist can gently examine your head and neck to check for any potential gland issues. Fortunately, sialadenitis can typically be cured with an antibiotic that causes symptoms to subside within a couple days. In more severe cases, surgery can be performed to drain the gland.

So remember: If you ever notice a lump or swelling in your neck, jaw, or mouth, contact a dentist on your True Dental Discounts, dental plan immediately – particularly if the lump is painful or makes it difficult to chew or swallow. Awareness of your body is the first step toward remaining healthy, so stay alert and seek help when needed.

Are Amalgam Fillings Safe?

The FDA has issued amalgam fillings harmless, however some people are not convinced. Amalgam fillings are silver and color and have a mixture of mercury, powdered silver, tin, and copper.
The reality is that there are few things in the dental industry that have gotten more attention than these fillings. In December of 2010, the FDA advisory panel got together again to reevaluate the safety of amalgam. They decided to uphold the prior statement, however they advised the FDA to continue in the evaluation of the safety of these fillings.

Amalgam fillings have been used 150 years. They have been the fillings of choice for so long because it is a very soft metal.

So you may be asking yourself what is the big concern over amalgam fillings. Well some critics have suspect that the fillings lead to neurological problems in fetuses and young children. The FDA acknowledges that the fillings do release very low amounts of mercury vapor that can be inhaled. The FDA concluded that the levels were too low to have any health implications to children above the age of 6. They also stated that the amount of mercury was so low that it did not affect the quality of breast milk to any amount that would affect the infants.

However, despite all this the FDA reclassified dental mercury from a class I device to a class II device. A class II needs special considerations and the dentist needs to warn the patient of any potential side effects.

There are alternatives to amalgam fillings and the truth is most dentists do not use them anymore. There is a new composite resin material that is used in place of the amalgam fillings. In addition to being safer this new style of filling is also white so it blends in perfectly with the other teeth.

Some people with amalgam fillings are concerned about the potential health risks and are seeking treatment to have their old amalgam fillings removed and replaced with newer white composite fillings. Having this done can be expensive, especially if you have more than a couple cavities; unfortunately dental insurance does not cover this, but there are options like discount dental plans, provided by that do help to offset the costs of amalgam removal by 20-60%.

How to Get Rid of Bad Breath

Many of us have bad breath or fear the embarrassment of having stinky breath and not knowing it. Some foods are bad for bad breath like garlic and onions because they contain oils which are carried through the bloodstream to your lungs. When you breath out, the stinky leftovers are exhaled.

The good news is just like there are bad foods to eat, there are also good foods. Good foods can actually mask the stinky breath. Here are some foods that will temporarily mask the bad smell.

Bad-Breath Busters
Foods that can help mask bad breath include:

  • Parsley. Parsley is one of the most effective natural ways to combat bad breath. The magic to its success come from the oils that are contained in the Parsley. Also herbs like cinnamon and spearmint can also work against bad breath.
  • Green tea. Green tea is another bad breath buster. It contains catechin which is a powerful antioxidant that fights against bacteria, thus reducing odors caused by bacteria.
  • Yogurt. Some studies have been conducted and have determined that certain cultures in yogurt help to reduce bad breath.
  • Apples and pears. Fruits also help to produce saliva, which helps to revitalize the natural balance of the mouth and wash down odor causing bacteria.
  • Oranges. Oranges or really any fruit that is high in vitamin C is helpful to combat odor causing bacteria. It also helps prevent gum disease.
  • Celery, Carrots, & Nuts. Crunchy foods are also good, they help remove plaque from the teeth and also help to increase saliva production.
  • Sugarless Gum. Sugarless Gum masks the odor, but it increases the saliva in your mouth. Saliva helps to wash away the smelly bacteria.

Practice Good Dental Hygiene
Food is really only a temporary solution to any bad breath problem. Most important, practice good oral hygiene. Brush your teeth for at least two minutes twice a day and floss daily. If bad breath is a problem, be sure to brush your tongue as well — that’s where odor-causing bacteria like to live, especially at night when your mouth is dry. Make certain to get regular dental checkups.

One of the best things you can do for your breath, is to practice good dental hygiene. This means brushing after every meal, once every morning, and once before bed. You should also flaws and use a mouth rinse.

Maintaining a Tooth-Friendly Diet

Eating heavily affects your dental health.  Dental health is important because it fosters healthy teeth and gums.  Some foods are tooth and gum friendly and actually prevent tooth and gum disease.

Learning what foods are good for your teeth is the 1st step in maintaining a healthy dental lifestyle.  The things that you eat affect your mouth, teeth, and gums – but more importantly it also effects your teeth and gums.

There are foods like fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean proteins, unsaturated fats that all are beneficial foods to eat.  However there are a few foods that really are above the rest, when it comes to dental health.

Milk is an important food to keep your teeth healthy.  Milk is loaded with calcium and  is extremely important for tooth and bone development in children and teens.

But the benefits do not stop there they continue as you get older.  A diet that is loaded with calcium also is show to prevent tooth decay.  When diets are lacking calcium, the body  uses minerals from the teeth and bones leaving your teeth and bones vulnerable.

In one study it was shown that having a daily intake of less than 500mg of calcium almost doubled the likelihood of developing periodontitis.

The FDA recommends that women younger than age 50 should take 1000 mg of calcium daily and 1200mg for women over 50.

Vitamin C
Vitamin C is an essential part of dental health.  Vitamin C works to repair connective tissue and help fight off infection.  A study was conducted and it shown that those who eat less than the recommended 75-90 milligrams each day are 25% more likely to get gingivitis compared to those who only consume 3X the recommended dose.

If you eat one orange a day it will help you meet the in maintaining  your Vitamin C intake.

Fruits & Vegetables
Crunchy foods are also good for your teeth, so make sure you put some crunch apples, pears, celery, and carrots into your lunch.  These foods work to remove bacteria and plaque from your mouth.

While you may think that tea would be bad for your teeth a study conducted has shown that black tea actually destroys cavity causing bacteria.

Eating the right foods will help your teeth, but it is not a total solution.  It is also important to brush after every meal, plus in the morning and at night.  Also floss at least once a day and use a fluoride mouth wash to help restore your enamel.

Fluoride And Your Teeth

Enamel the outer layer of the crown of a tooth is made of closely packed mineral crystals.

Enamel is a very important part of the tooth, it is a protective layer made up of very dense mineral crystals. Everyday some enamel is lost due to a process called demineralization, this happens when plaque releases a acidic byproduct that harms the teeth. Luckily your body naturally tries to fight back against demineralization and attempts to try to restore this destructive process. This is done through minerals in the saliva, such as fluoride, calcium and phosphate, are deposited back into the enamel.

The reality is that your body probably will not be able to fully combat the effects of demineralization without some help. Too much loss of minerals without enough replacement leads to tooth decay. Fluoride helps in two ways. When children drink fluoride in small doses, it enters the bloodstream and helps to build strong permanent teeth; also fluoride can strengthen teeth from the outside, when it comes into contact with the teeth. When teeth are strengthened with fluoride, it makes it harder for the acids to erode the enamel of the teeth.

Fluoride is all around us, it is in foods and used as a supplement in some drinking water. This helps benefit the tooth development in people younger than 16. Topical fluorides are also available in many dental tooth pastes or rinses. While you are only using the fluoride for a short time, the elevated levels of fluoride levels last for hours after.
When you go to the dentist professional fluoride treatments are given. They are applied as a varnish, foam, or gel. When the dentist applies fluoride to your teeth, it is in a much higher concentration than over-the-counter treatments.

In certain cases special fluoride concentrations are prescribed to children who live in areas where fluoride is not added to the drinking water. Normally these supplements will be given to children between the age of 6 months to 16 years old.

Fluoride supplements should be given if your drinking water is not fluoridated. They are available in liquids and tablets. Your dentist or your pediatrician will need to prescribe them to you.

Is it Harmful
Fluoride is safe if it is used in safe dosages, but in heavy dosages it can be harmful, so it is important to monitor the fluoride levels if you are using it in your home. City water is constantly monitored to maintain save fluoride levels.

Dental Care – Budget Options

According to a study, 79% of low income people without dental insurance are not aware of any affordable options for dental care.  The good news is there are affordable option,  you just have to know where to look.

These low-cost dental care resources may be available in your community:

  • Dental schools. Many dental schools offer low cost dental work at a reduced cost.  The dental care is provided by the students, under the direction of a trained professor.
  • Community health centers. Some Cities have community programs that offer low cost or in some cases even free dental care.  These programs are run by volunteers that want to help give back to the community.  So check with you local municipality to find these community programs.
  • Discount dental plans. These plans are usually less expensive than dental insurance.  Discount dental plans are a very inexpensive option to get a lot of savings on your dental bills.  These programs work by giving you access to a network of dentists that have agreed to work at a discounted rate, in exchange for more business.  These discounts can range from 20-60% off and normally cost as little as $5.95 a month.

Certain dentists will take payment plans, so if the above options are not enough you can call around to find a dentist that will do the work with just a little money up front.  You then can agree to make monthly payments to pay for your work.